All posts tagged: halal

Eggplant Parmigiana

Eggplant Parmigiana or Parmigiana Di Melanzane is a traditional 3-ingredient recipe from Sicily, Italy. Contrary to what we would all think, “Parmigiana” does not mean “Parmesan cheese”. Parmigiana comes from the Sicilian word parmiciana which means “latticed” and it describes the way we arrange the eggplant slices in the baking pan or casserole prior to baking. Enjoy!

Korean Beef Short Rib Soup with Glass Noodles – Galbi-tang

Galbi-tang is a hearty yet fragrant and often delicate clear beef short rib soup, traditionally offered at Korean wedding receptions. It is now one of Korea’s staple recipes and a regular entry in every Korean restaurant’s menu that’s worth its salt. (Pun intended. :)) Galbi-tang is not difficult to make; but, as all good soups and stews, it just takes some patience – that’s all. Time to cook, eh?

Pasta with Butter and Cream – all’ Alfredo

Yes, Pasta with Butter and Cream – a.k.a. Pasta all’ Alfredo – has very little to do with the all-millennial “tuna salad” lunch or dinner; yet, good food is good food and there’s no two ways about that. 🙂 This is an easy and fast pasta recipe to make – and you don’t need to eat a lot of it to feel satisfied. Enjoy!

Lamb or Goat with Artichokes in Egg and Lemon Sauce

Lamb or Goat with Artichokes in Egg and Lemon Sauce is a classic, traditional Spring dish from Crete, Greece that’s simple to make and very easy to savour. The season for artichokes is between March and June. For the rest of the year you could use canned or frozen artichokes – but do avoid marinated artichokes – they are a totally different deal and will not go well with we’re making here. Time now to start cooking, eh?

Octopus with Pasta in the Pot

Octopus with Pasta in the Pot – guaranteed to keep your body going whatever you have to do. It is going to take some time to cook – approx. 2 hours – but its level of difficulty is minimal: sautee, simmer, stir, do something else while food is cooking. (That difficult. 🙂 ) Enjoy!

Lamb with Pasta in the Oven

Lamb with Pasta in the Oven. A simple, hearty, traditional (insanely) delicious recipe from Crete, Greece requiring no particular preparation and… very little cooking skills. Of course, you can tweak the recipe with more/other spices but if you’re cooking this recipe for the first time… try to keep it simple. 🙂

Rice with Green Lentils, Raisins and Dates – Persian Style – Adas Polo

Rice with Green Lentils,Raisins and Dates – Persian Style – Adas Polo. This is another Persian classic recipe that seldom needs further introduction. The ingredients are available all year long. There are many, many variations of this recipe; some recipes, like this one, are meatless, some use lamb, others use beef, some employ a different mix of spices – the variations are… endless.

Fresh Herb Kuku – Persian Rice Recipe

Fresh Herb Kuku – Persian rice recipe. In Iran, this is an essential dish for the New Year’s feast. For the rest of us it’s a fantastic, fresh, and nutritious recipe. It has various preparation stages but don’t let that intimidate you from enjoying a truthfully fragrant dish. Enjoy!

Turkish Cheesecake – Künefe

The Turkish Cheesecake Künefe or Kanafeh is the Middle Eastern version of Cheesecake. Unlike the Western iterations of the concept Künefe does not contain cream as a cooking ingredient. There are many ways to make Künefe. Some call for a frying pan or skillet; others use the oven; most of them use sugar; others use honey; some suggest to serve Künefe with Kaymak (buffalo milk cream); others don’t care about cream. And so on, and so forth. Our Turkish Cheesecake recipe is made in the oven and uses honey syrup instead of sugar syrup.

Goat Cooked in Water and Olive Oil

Slow Cooking Supreme, this one. Long time to prepare, simple to cook and mouthwatering taste. We picked this recipe when, at some point in life, we were roaming the mountains of Crete/Greece casting for a TV food & cooking show. A shepherd offered us this dish as lunch. Forgetting it proved impossible.

Traditional Turkish Baklava Recipe with Honey Syrup

Baklava is Turkish Cuisine’s most emblematic and widely known dessert. Other nations in the area make it too, with certain twists. E.g. the Greeks prefer less spice in their Baklava, the Lebanese tend to want their Baklava drier (with less syrup) and cut in mouthfuls, etc.

Classic Yoghurt Marinated Indian Lamb Curry

Classic Yoghurt Marinated Indian Lamb Curry | myfoodistry This is a classic Yoghurt Marinated Indian Lamb Curry recipe that is very popular in the North of India. The recipe is healthy and nutritious to boot. Preparation Time: PT Cooking Time: PT Total Time: PT Recipe Ingredients: Cuisine: IndianRegion: North This is a classic Yoghurt Marinated Indian Lamb Curry recipe that is very popular in the North of India. The recipe is also healthy and nutritious to boot. (Scroll down for the analysis.) Serves 6Cooking time: 40 – 60 minYou will need: a skilletNotes: requires marinating Ingredients 1 Kg (2 lbs) x boneless leg of lamb, cut into 1-in (2.5-cm) cubes 3 Tbsp oil 5 cardamom pods 3 bay leaves 1 inch (2.5-cm) cinnamon stick 1 Tsp cumin seeds 1 Tbsp ground coriander 4 fresh green chili peppers, without seeds, minced 1 tomato, chopped 2 cups warm water 1 cup plain yogurt 1⁄2 cup fresh coriander leaves (cilantro), chopped Yogurt Curry Marinade 3 onions, chopped 1 Tbsp Asian chili powder or ground cayenne pepper 1 Tbsp …

Potato Salad with Olive Oil, Capers, Parsley and Pickles (among other things)

Potato Salad with Olive Oil, Capers, Parsley and Pickles . Another hearty and healthy classic potato salad recipe from the European South. Omitting wine makes it Halal and also Lenten. Can be had as a main dish, or as a side dish – your choice. Enjoy!

Lebanese Crispy Pita Bread with Sumak

Lebanese Crispy Pita Bread with Sumak . Resembling the Italian Pizza Contadina (the farmer’s pizza) the Lebanese use this Pita Bread with sumak as a side dish to scoop up juice or dips, or even as a snack for “that” time of day. It is easy to make and easier to savour. Enjoy!

Armenian Lule Kebab

Armenian Lule Kebab. “Lule” means “sausage shape” in Armenian. (In the Near and Middle East they like their Kebabs (burgers, really) to look like sausages: long and skinny.) This Armenian Lule Kebab recipe is a good one: fragrant, complex and completely satisfying. The non-Kosher among us can accompany Lule with mint-flavoured yogurt.

How to Make Vegetable Stock

How to Make Vegetable Stock. A vegetable stock is nothing more than vegetables simmered in a very low fire for some time, so that the veggies release all their essence and flavours in the liquid. It can be made as complicated as one can make it – there’s no rule here. We present a basic vegetable stock recipe that – we believe – will serve you well.

Turkish Lamb Stew over Eggplant Puree (Hünkar Beğendi)

Hunkar Begendi is an ultra-classic, traditional Turkish recipe whose name translates to “Sultan’s Delight”. As we can reasonably imagine there are many, many variations of Hünkar Beğendi: some recipes call for cheese and milk, others for milk and flour. Some call for lamb, others of beef. Some call for butter, others for olive oil and some “Westernized” versions even call for … vegetable oil and margarine (hello?). We chose a version that (we believe) is most representative of Turkey and its people.

Moroccan Lamb Tagine with Dates, Almonds and Pistachios

The Moroccan Lamb Tagine with Dates, Almonds and Pistachios is a classic Moroccan Tagine recipe that’s usually made for weddings and family gatherings. It will take some time to cook but… as with almost all traditional recipes everywhere in the World there’s no shortcut: it. must. cook. slowly.

Egyptian Fava Bean Stew – Fuul

The Egyptian Fava Bean Stew or Fuul as a staple food is probably as old as Egypt. There are many variations (of course). We present an ultra-classic Fuul recipe as a basis – and then you’re free to change the flavour and/or add the topings of your choice.

Anglo – Indian Lamb Mulligatawny Stew or Soup

The Anglo-Indian Mulligatawny stew is where West meets East, and vice versa. According to Wikipedia, “Mulligatawny is related to the soup rasam. Due to its popularity in England during British India, it was one of the few items of Indian cuisine that found common mention in the literature of the period. Early references to it in English go back to year 1784.” There are many variations of this recipe – some use ghee, others oil, some use lentils, other use lamb or beef, others are vegetarian. This one calls for lamb and lentils.

Chicken Stew with Green Peppers in the Pot

Chicken Stew with Green Peppers in the Pot is a chicken stew recipe from Greece’s mountainous Northwest. (Yes, Greece has mountains too.) Unlike other Greek recipes this one includes spices. This is a complete meal – there’s little need for sides, other than a slice of bread and perhaps some feta cheese (if you’re not kosher.) Enjoy!