All posts tagged: pot

Octopus with Pasta in the Pot

Octopus with Pasta in the Pot – guaranteed to keep your body going whatever you have to do. It is going to take some time to cook – approx. 2 hours – but its level of difficulty is minimal: sautee, simmer, stir, do something else while food is cooking. (That difficult. 🙂 ) Enjoy!

Rice with Green Lentils, Raisins and Dates – Persian Style – Adas Polo

Rice with Green Lentils,Raisins and Dates – Persian Style – Adas Polo. This is another Persian classic recipe that seldom needs further introduction. The ingredients are available all year long. There are many, many variations of this recipe; some recipes, like this one, are meatless, some use lamb, others use beef, some employ a different mix of spices – the variations are… endless.

Goat Cooked in Water and Olive Oil

Slow Cooking Supreme, this one. Long time to prepare, simple to cook and mouthwatering taste. We picked this recipe when, at some point in life, we were roaming the mountains of Crete/Greece casting for a TV food & cooking show. A shepherd offered us this dish as lunch. Forgetting it proved impossible.

Potato Salad with Olive Oil, Capers, Parsley and Pickles (among other things)

Potato Salad with Olive Oil, Capers, Parsley and Pickles . Another hearty and healthy classic potato salad recipe from the European South. Omitting wine makes it Halal and also Lenten. Can be had as a main dish, or as a side dish – your choice. Enjoy!

Pasta alla Carbonara (the real one)

Pasta alla Carbonara. “Alla Carbonara” means “the coal worker’s style”. No one knows how this recipe got its name – some maintain that charcoal workers in the Italian mountains cooked spaghetti this way, others that the very generous dash of black pepper makes the dish look like charcoal. Whatever the case, this is a very classic Italian dish, presented here in its original form, with eggs instead of cream. Enjoy!

Turkish Lamb Stew over Eggplant Puree (Hünkar Beğendi)

Hunkar Begendi is an ultra-classic, traditional Turkish recipe whose name translates to “Sultan’s Delight”. As we can reasonably imagine there are many, many variations of Hünkar Beğendi: some recipes call for cheese and milk, others for milk and flour. Some call for lamb, others of beef. Some call for butter, others for olive oil and some “Westernized” versions even call for … vegetable oil and margarine (hello?). We chose a version that (we believe) is most representative of Turkey and its people.

Egyptian Fava Bean Stew – Fuul

The Egyptian Fava Bean Stew or Fuul as a staple food is probably as old as Egypt. There are many variations (of course). We present an ultra-classic Fuul recipe as a basis – and then you’re free to change the flavour and/or add the topings of your choice.

Anglo – Indian Lamb Mulligatawny Stew or Soup

The Anglo-Indian Mulligatawny stew is where West meets East, and vice versa. According to Wikipedia, “Mulligatawny is related to the soup rasam. Due to its popularity in England during British India, it was one of the few items of Indian cuisine that found common mention in the literature of the period. Early references to it in English go back to year 1784.” There are many variations of this recipe – some use ghee, others oil, some use lentils, other use lamb or beef, others are vegetarian. This one calls for lamb and lentils.

Chicken Stew with Green Peppers in the Pot

Chicken Stew with Green Peppers in the Pot is a chicken stew recipe from Greece’s mountainous Northwest. (Yes, Greece has mountains too.) Unlike other Greek recipes this one includes spices. This is a complete meal – there’s little need for sides, other than a slice of bread and perhaps some feta cheese (if you’re not kosher.) Enjoy!